Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Botio Nikoltchev: What Shall Be Done for Bulgarian Cyrillic .loclBGR

In this article I would like to describe the differences between the Bulgarian and Russian Cyrillic. Then I will list the characters you have to include in your fonts if you like to make Bulgarian Cyrillic and the different ways you can make it work with the Open Type features. Lets start with which Letters are different between Russian and Bulgarian Cyrillic. I will specify them for both Sans and Serif typefaces.

.loclBGR for Grotesque Typefaces

Russian Cyrillic
А
Б
В
Г
Д
Е
Ё
Ж
З
И
Й
К
Л
М
Н
О
П
Р
С
Т
У
Ф
Х
Ц
Ч
Ш
Щ
Ъ
Ы
Ь
Э
Ю
Я
Ѝ

а
б
в
г
д
е
ё
ж
з
и
й
к
л
м
н
о
п
р
с
т
у
ф
х
ц
ч
ш
щ
ъ
ы
ь
э
ю
я
ѝ

Bulgarian Modern Cyrillic Script
А
Б
В
Г
Д
Е
Ж
З
И
Й
К
Л
М
Н
О
П
Р
С
Т
У
Ф
Х
Ц
Ч
Ш
Щ
Ъ
Ь
Ю
Я
Ѝ

а
б
в
г
д
е
ж
з
и
й
к
л
м
н
о
п
р
с
т
у
ф
х
ц
ч
ш
щ
ъ
ь
ю
я
ѝ

The red characters are in Russian style and the orange ones in Bulgarian. Please do not forget to include the letters Ѝ and ѝ letter. These characters are needed in the Bulgarian language. The following characters are all you have to include for loclBGR in your Sans Fonts. Some of the glyphs don’t have to be redesigned in Italics.

In case you are using SAFARI please see this POP-UP window or follow this LINK.

  Д (uni0414) is optional
  Ѝ (uni040D)
  Л (uni041B)
  Ф (uni0424) is optional
  в (uni0432)
  г (uni0433)
  д (uni0434)
  ж (uni0436)
  з (uni0437)
  и (uni0438) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  й (uni0439) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  ѝ (uni045D) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  к (uni043A)
  л (uni043B)
  п (uni043F) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  т (uni0442) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  ц (uni0446)
  ш (uni0448) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  щ (uni0449) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic 
  ю (uni044E)

.loclBGR for Serif Typefaces

Russian Cyrillic
А
Б
В
Г
Д
Е
Ё
Ж
З
И
Й
К
Л
М
Н
О
П
Р
С
Т
У
Ф
Х
Ц
Ч
Ш
Щ
Ъ
Ы
Ь
Э
Ю
Я
Ѝ

а
б
в
г
д
е
ё
ж
з
и
й
к
л
м
н
о
п
р
с
т
у
ф
х
ц
ч
ш
щ
ъ
ы
ь
э
ю
я
ѝ

Bulgarian Modern Cyrillic Script
А
Б
В
Г
Д
Е
Ж
З
И
Й
К
Л
М
Н
О
П
Р
С
Т
У
Ф
Х
Ц
Ч
Ш
Щ
Ъ
Ь
Ю
Я
Ѝ

а
б
в
г
д
е
ж
з
и
й
к
л
м
н
о
п
р
с
т
у
ф
х
ц
ч
ш
щ
ъ
ь
ю
я
ѝ

 

In case you are using SAFARI please see this POP-UP window or follow this LINK.

.loclBGR for Serif Typefaces

The following characters-list have to be included in your Serif Fonts. Please consider that the Serif fonts list is a little bit longer. Some of the glyphs don’t have to be redesigned in Italics.

  Д (uni0414) is optional
  И (uni0418)
  Й (uni0419)
  Ѝ (uni040D)
  Л (uni041B)
  Ф (uni0424) is optional

  в (uni0432)
  г (uni0433)
  д (uni0434)
  ж (uni0436)
  з (uni0437)
  и (uni0438) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  й (uni0439) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ѝ (uni045D) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  к (uni043A)
  л (uni043B)
  н (uni043D)
  п (uni043F) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  т (uni0442) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ц (uni0446) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ч (uni0447) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ш (uni0448) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  щ (uni0449) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ь (uni044C) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ъ (uni044A) usually there is no need to redesign in Italic
  ю (uni044E)

Historical forms

If you like you can also include some historical forms. They are important for scientific and old texts set before the 1945 spelling reform.

  Ѫ (uni046A)
  ѫ (uni046B)
  Ѣ (uni0462)
  ѣ (uni0463)

How to make .loclBGR work in OpenType

In my opinion there are two ways to make Bulgarian Cyrillic work in your OpenTypes. The first way is use Open Type ’locl’ feature (Localized Forms). You have to add a .loclBGR suffix to all characters which have Bulgarian Cyrillic forms. The second way is to define them as a Stylistic Set. I recommend implementing both features so you can assure that the Bulgarian forms will work properly in all Apps and will also give the opportunity to non-Bulgarian designers to use them without switching the spell check of the text they are working on. So let’s code a little. First you have to make sure that you have the language system in your Font:

 languagesystem cyrl dflt;
 languagesystem cyrl BGR; 

This is how the script should look like for local Bulgarian feature (locl)

  feature locl{ 
  script cyrl;
  language BGR ;
   sub uni0414 by uni0414.loclBGR;
   sub uni041B by uni041B.loclBGR;
   sub uni0424 by uni0424.loclBGR;
   sub uni0432 by uni0432.loclBGR;
   sub uni0433 by uni0433.loclBGR;
   sub uni0434 by uni0434.loclBGR;
   sub uni0436 by uni0436.loclBGR;
   sub uni0437 by uni0437.loclBGR;
   sub uni0438 by uni0438.loclBGR;
   sub uni0439 by uni0439.loclBGR;
   sub uni045D by uni045D.loclBGR;
   sub uni043A by uni043A.loclBGR;
   sub uni043B by uni043B.loclBGR;
   sub uni043F by uni043F.loclBGR;
   sub uni0442 by uni0442.loclBGR;
   sub uni0446 by uni0446.loclBGR;
   sub uni0448 by uni0448.loclBGR;
   sub uni0449 by uni0449.loclBGR;
   sub uni044E by uni044E.loclBGR;
  }locl;

Of course if you like your code to be cleaner, you can make two classes. For example, locl1 class for the Russian characters and locl2 class for the Bulgarian ones. Et voilà! The script looks like this:

  feature locl{ 
  script cyrl;
  language BGR ;
   sub @locl1 by @locl2;
  }locl;

Then you can do the same for the Stylistic Set. For example, I decided to make the Bulgarian Cyrillic as stylistic set 04 (.ss04). I’m using the “ss04” (Stylistic Set 04) in my example but of course you can use any stylistic set from 01 to 20, so in your case it can be “ss01” or “ss07”, depending on how many stylistic sets your font will have.
Please note that it is not necessary to duplicate the characters which you have already made as .lclBGR and then rename them with suffix .ss04.
For that purpose we will just make a little hack in the code:

  feature ss04{ 
   sub uni0414 by uni0414.loclBGR;
   sub uni041B by uni041B.loclBGR;
   sub uni0424 by uni0424.loclBGR;
   sub uni0432 by uni0432.loclBGR;
   sub uni0433 by uni0433.loclBGR;
   sub uni0434 by uni0434.loclBGR;
   sub uni0436 by uni0436.loclBGR;
   sub uni0437 by uni0437.loclBGR;
   sub uni0438 by uni0438.loclBGR;
   sub uni0439 by uni0439.loclBGR;
   sub uni045D by uni045D.loclBGR;
   sub uni043A by uni043A.loclBGR;
   sub uni043B by uni043B.loclBGR;
   sub uni043F by uni043F.loclBGR;
   sub uni0442 by uni0442.loclBGR;
   sub uni0446 by uni0446.loclBGR;
   sub uni0448 by uni0448.loclBGR;
   sub uni0449 by uni0449.loclBGR;
   sub uni044E by uni044E.loclBGR;
  }ss04

For sure you can use also classes:

  feature ss04{
   sub @locl1 by @locl2;
  } ss04

Marks in the Cyrillic Script

Some characters in the Cyrillic script need marks but they do not have a Unicode and actually do not exist as precomposed characters. A nice way to make them work is using Combining Marks. Please note that in that case the kerning might have some issues. I will talk about them a little bit later.

  CyrillicBrevecomb (no unicode)
  Gravecomb (uni0300)
  Acutecomb (uni0301)

The following characters need Anchors so that the combining marks will be positioned properly:

  А (uni0410)
  Г (uni0413)
  Е (uni0415)
  З (uni0417)
  И (uni0418)
  К (uni041A)
  О (uni041E)
  С (uni0421)
  У (uni0423)
  Ъ (uni042A)
  Ю (uni042E)
  Я (uni042F)
  а (uni0430)
  г (uni0433)
  е (uni0435)
  з (uni0437)
  и (uni0438)
  к (uni043A)
  о (uni043E)
  с (uni0441)
  у (uni0443)
  ъ (uni044A)
  ю (uni044E)
  я (uni044F)

You can also create them as precomposed characters and then access them via OT features. In my opinion this method works better but makes the font size bigger. First you have to define three lookups in the Feature Panel/Prefix (if you work with Glyphs App. In FontLab the “prefix” is the down square in the OpenType panel. In the following code example in the last lookup are the actual precomposed characters.

  lookup loclBGRa{
    sub uni0433 by uni0433.loclBGR;
    sub uni043A by uni043A.loclBGR;
    ...
  }loclBGRa;

  lookup loclBGRb{
    sub uni0453 by uni0433.loclBGR acutecomb;
    sub uni045C by uni043A.loclBGR acutecomb;    
    ...
  }loclBGRb;

  lookup loclBGRc{
    sub uni0433.loclBGR acutecomb by uni0433_acutecomb.loclBGR;
    sub uni043A.loclBGR acutecomb by uni043A_acutecomb.loclBGR;
    ...
  }loclBGRc;

Ok, then we can use this lookups in every feature that we need. In our particular case we defined Bulgarian Cyrillic as .loclBGR and .ss04. For the local feature the code looks like this:

  feature locl{
    script cyrl;
    language BGR;
    lookup loclBGRa;
    lookup loclBGRb;
    lookup loclBGRc;
  }locl;

And for the stylisic set 04 like this:

  feature ss04{
    lookup loclBGRa;
    lookup loclBGRb;
    lookup loclBGRc;
  }ss04;

The Future

Let’s talk a little bit about the future. Cyrillic Script is still evolving nowadays. The type-designers go different ways to solve its issues. That is one of the main reasons why we have Bulgarian and Russian Cyrillic. Actually I am not a big fan of this division. In my opinion there is just one Cyrillic with different solutions, which is quite nice in the complex world we live in. I often hear from Russian and Western type-designers that they do like the so-called Bulgarian forms. And that’s why I asked myself how would it be possible to use both designs not just as local forms but as the entire Cyrillic Extended. One way would be to include all the characters which have different forms:

  ѓ ќ ґ ғ җ ҙ қ ҝ ҡ

double (with Russian and Bulgarian form) and then define them in the features as I described above. This will expand the Font and increase the file size. Another possibility or idea, which is based on the ttfdiet tool made by Adam Twardoch and Karsten Lücke, would be to use the ‘ccmp’ feature, but which can also be used in other features like “locl” and ”ss04”. Then the feature code will look like this:

  feature locl{
    script cyrl; 
    language BGR;
    lookup loclBGRa{
     sub uni0433 by uni0433.loclBGR;  
     sub uni043A by uni043A.loclBGR; ... 
    } loclBGRa;   
    lookup loclBGRb {  
     sub uni0453 by uni0433.loclBGR acutecomb;  
     sub uni045C by uni043A.loclBGR acutecomb; ... 
    }loclBGRb;
   }locl;

Many years ago in a hardware store I read this quote: “ If your computer does not cause any problems it is already too old.” That seems to be true for all new developments. The method above is not an exception. The main issue is with the kerning. For example, we have the character ”ӑ” which is actually compounded from two glyphs: the Cyrillic letter “a” (uni0430) and the cyrillic breve “˘” That means that the text-engine will not interpret the combinations as a “letter, a-breve, letter” but as “letter, a-cyrillic, breve-cyrillic, letter”. This causes two types of problems with the kerning. The first problem appears with combinations like ”T,ӑ-cyrillic” which will be interpreted as “T, a-cyrillic, breve-cyrillic” by the text-engine. This means that we will have the kerning value of ”T,a-cyrillic” thus the “T” might end rather close to the breve – . Second problem is with combinations like ”ӑk” which will be interpreted as “a-cyrillic, breve- cyrillic, k-cyrillic” as a result we will have no kerning (it does not make any sense to kern combining marks). There is a possibility to set „lookupflag IgnoreMarks;“ in the kerning feature. The marks between two characters will be ignored from the text engine. In this particular example we will have the kerning value of ”ak”.Another approach is the so called contextual kerning “kern ‘Ta’ by +20 if ‘a’ is followed by a combining Mark”. The only App which provides UI for making contextual kerning is Microsoft VOLT. So as you see we still have a lot to do for the Cyrillic Script in technical and in design aspect.

8 July 2016

Botio Nikoltchev

Originally published on LETTERSOUP.DE
Republished with the permission of the author

Type is a cultural heritage, it is one of the ways to recreate the surrounding world

By Szandra Peev • 25 January 2021
INTERVIEW with Botio Nikoltchev | LETTERSOUP
PHOTOS: © Lettersoup, © Boryana Pandova, © Svoboda Tzekova
BG
EN
Lettersoup founder: Botio Nikoltchev, photo by Boryana Pandova | LETTERSOUP
Lettersoup founder: Botio Nikoltchev, photo by Boryana Pandova

In this exclusive interview Botio Nikoltchev speaks about his professional development. He was a student of Lucas de Groot and after graduating he had the chance to work with such famous type designers as Akira Kobayashi and Erik Spiekermann. Botio also shares his views on the diversity of Cyrillic letterform models in the different Cyrillic alphabets. He tells us about the project Sofia Sans, which is now the typeface of Sofia – the capital of Bulgaria. Botio also describes his newest release Apparat and reveals his future plans.

Let’s talk about your professional and creative journey. Where did it start – in Sofia or Berlin? Which colleagues and professors have left a mark on your work?

Botio Nikoltchev (BN): I don’t see myself as an artist but more as an addict. Type design is actually an endless way of improvement, an endless search of harmony and rhythm, an endless desire of beauty and ugliness.

It was a long way until I started designing typefaces. But yes, it was in Berlin, I started my studies as an industrial designer. My love for type came by taking typography classes with Prof. Betina Müller and type-design classes with Prof. Lucas de Groot.

Lucas de Groot and Botio Nikoltchev
Pepa Karaivanova, Lucas de Groot, Sonja Knecht, Botio Nikoltchev in Sofia on 24th May, photo Sv. Tzekova

I was lucky to have the opportunity to work with some leading type designers. There were moments I thought Akira Kobayashi doesn’t have eyes, but microscopes. His ability to see the smallest details is really incredible.

Erik Spiekermann –– what a literate and entertaining man. Оnce we talked about Bulgarian history and his knowledge truly impressed me. He is not just able to recognize problems on a daily life basis, and solve them through design, but he is also excellent in finding the right people at the right time for the job.

You are part of many font projects in which you are also responsible for the development of the Cyrillic script. What are the main challenges which a modern type designer needs to overcome when working on Cyrillic font projects?

Apparat
Font family: Apparat; Release 2020; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev

BN: The challenges are quite similar to the Latin and there are no particular ones. It always depends on the project, the client etc.

Of course there are decisions to be made e.g. how to handle characters like “K”. They could have the same grapheme but they also could look different in Latin, Cyrillic and Greek.

What is your personal and professional view on the local forms of the Cyrillic like Bulgarian, Serbian, North Macedonain, Ukrainian and the Cyrillic used by Mongolians, Bashkirs etc.?

BN: Although as a type designer I work mostly with a black and white colors, I enjoy very much the colorful aspects of life. I like the diverseness of the Cyrillic world and the character variations.

When you think in terms of evolution, it never moves in a straight direction and it never ends at one particular point. So to me these variations are the epitome of the continuously flowing and changing Cyrillic world.

A while ago, together with Vassil Kateliev we launched a research on the handwritten forms of these languages. The idea was and still is to prove if Buglarian Cyrillic can serve the entire Cyrillic character set.

What motivates you to support the Bulgarian Cyrillic form (you call it Rounded Cyrillic)? In your opinion, what is the future of the Cyrillic script?

Apparat
Font family: Apparat; Release 2020; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev

BN: I believe Bulgarians need the Bulgarian Cyrillic. Type is a cultural heritage, it is one of the ways to recreate the surrounding world. Thus type expresses our worldview, our philosophy of life. By not having the Bulgarian Cyrillic we’ll also lack our worldview.

“Type is a cultural heritage, it is one of the ways to recreate the surrounding world.”

Yes, I prefer to call the Bulgarian forms Rounded Cyrillic and the Russian forms Square Cyrillic. It describes the designs and it does not have political touch. Back in 2017, my friend Adam Twardoch came up with the idea about the name. It was based on the rounded- and square Glagolitic.

I worked several years, of course together with a number of colleagues and friends, on “the future” and now there is a standard which characters should be designed for Bulgarian Cyrillic, as well as implemented Bulgarian character set (encodings) in the font editors, there is a technical guideline on how to set the Open Type features in order to perform properly local forms in all browsers and apps. Monotype and Google fonts are including and producing the Rounded Cyillic in nearly all new releases and an increasing number of western designers are creating Bugarian Cyrillic for their typefaces. When you look back, several years ago the fonts with Bulgarian Cyrillic were scarce goods.

.loclBGR for Grotesque Typefaces
What shall be done for Bulgarian Cyrillic .loclBGR
Font family: Sofia Sans; Release 2019; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev, Ani Petrova

Тhe next step for me is to see the Rounded and Squared Cyrillic as equals. By now, the Russian forms are in default position in the fonts and Bulgarian forms on local feature or stylistic set. Soon, I’m about to release quite a big font family where the Bulgarian forms are in default position.

But I would like to see the next years in “the past”. We do have so many artefacts, books, manuscripts that are quite unexplored. We don’t really know much about the history. In fact, we don’t even have a reasonable answer to questions like why the Cyriliic was developed and why we switched to it instead of the Glagolitic.

How many Bulgarian books about typedesign do you know… four! And how many of them are translated into English – none!

In 2019, the chief architect of Sofia Zdravko Zdravkov announced that he will suggest all the labels on the streets and official documents of Sofia municipality to use a unified font standard. This font is called Sofia Sans – a co-project of Ani Petrova and Botio Nikoltchev. Did Sofia Sans become the typeface of the capital?

BN: I’m truly happy this project happened. More than 30 years after so many efforts, there is a political understanding for the need of better visual language in our cities. But this transformation happens quite slowly.

This project is also made in a large team – it started with Ani Petrova, Filip Bojadjiev and me. Then Andreas Eigendorf, Eli Hoyer and Viviana Monsalve did the mastering and produced Variable Fonts. Mario Evstatiev and I made several pixel versions of Sofia Sans for the public transport. But yes, I think meanwhile it is the typeface of the bulgarian capital city. You can see it on the tourist wayfinding system, on the street signs, on the public transport. Аlso the Bulgarian State Railways use it, I saw it also on one of the private TV channels. It seems people like it a lot.

It is worth mentioning that we published the typeface with an Open Font License, as I think such projects should be Open Source. Sofia Sans will be soon released on Google Fonts as well, and the latest versions will be always published on our Github account.

With this project I also managed to achieve a goal of mine. Bulgarian Cyrillic is in default position in the fonts.

I think with a typeface of such a largе scale – 4 widths and 11 weights and also on Google Fonts, where there is a huge amount of users, it is quite a statement.

At the beginning of 2021 you published your latest font – Apparat. How does Apparat fit in the modern visual communication – as a reinterpretation of the past or as a search for classic clean and modern drawing?

Font family: Apparat; Release 2020; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev
Font family: Quasimoda; Release 2016; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev

BN: It is clearly an interpretation of the past, actually I´m exploring Dwiggins approach to “humanise” geometric sans forms. Apparat’s design is the result of both historical research and experience gained during the design of custom fonts.

The idea was to create a large contemporary type family in four widths—Standard, Semi Condensed, Condensed, and Extra Condensed, a geometric sans serif with subtle humanistic design traits that has a well-rounded personality that stands out when used in display applications; however, the characteristic design details recede to the background not to attract unnecessary attention when using the typeface in small sizes for body copy.

Creating such a wide range has become more accessible in contemporary typeface development thanks to interpolation, which facilitates calculating intermediary steps between two extremes. But typefaces that are clearly interpolated run the risk of looking mechanic and soulless and often lack character. Having the technology available doesn’t mean it necessarily needs to be used. Apparat avoids these pitfalls by having no perfect harmony between the different weights and widths. These intentional variations lend each type style its specific personality that complements the others.

Apparat
Font family: Apparat; Release 2020; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev

Peter Bilak once said that modern fonts are a result of teamwork between many professionals. What is the future of typedesign and where is the thin line between individual and teamwork?

BN: Typedesign is and was a very consrvative field. I don’t think we will see any big revolutions in type soon.

I absolutely agree with Peter Bil’ak that modern typefaces are teamwork in a design aspect but also because they are complex products. It is not just the idea or the design. There are many script systems, there is quality assurance, there is mastering of the fonts, there are marketing materials like specimens, websites, social media communication.

So yes, for a big multilingual typefaces you need a large team of professionals in all these fields. But I also love to discuss my basic designs with friends and colleagues, to exchange ideas, to hear different points of view.

What are your plans for 2021 and beyond?

BN: I hope 2021 is more favorable to all of us! This year together with Viktor Nübel I will resume a big custom project for Cornelsen publishing house. Cornelsen are one of the main schoolbook publishers in Germany. I´m very proud that we won this design pitch and very thankful for this opportunity. We are creating a huge type sistem with sans and serif typeface, also with different widths, optical size designs etc.

It is quite interesting to work for such a big company with all the different departments like print, web, app developer who all have their own requirements on a very high quality level.

In the next few weeks, there will be a long awaited Sofia Sans variable font release on Google Fonts with OFL license.

I’m working on several new typefaces simultaneously, but I don’t want to reveal so much.

Apparat
Font family: Apparat; Release 2020; Copyright: Botio Nikoltchev
Botio Nikoltchev is a typographer, CEO and “chef” of the lettersoup fonts. Born in Sofia, he graduated in communication design in Potsdam, Germany. He lives and works in Berlin.
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Szandra Peev

Szandra Peev has been working in the field of communications and marketing for almost a decade now. Her curiosity to explore new cultures and destinations took her to Asia where for five years she worked with some of the biggest multinational companies globally. Currently, Szandra is back in Europe, leading the communications and marketing efforts for localfonts.eu and contributing as a writer in print and online media outlets.

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15 March 2021

LETTERJUICE

An interview with Pilar Cano and Ferran Milan about global and local fonts and their latest font Baldufa

Type design needs to respect the language and the culture it represents

In this exclusive interview Pilar Cano and Ferran Milan, founders of Letterjuice type design studio, talk about the importance of respecting the language and the culture when creating new font designs. They also share their view on global and local fonts and the process of creating new fonts. They reveal the launch of their new font Baldufa, which now supports 4 writing systems.
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LETTERSOUP
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Szandra Peev

25 January 2021

LETTERSOUP

An interview with Botio Nikoltchev from LETTERSOUP about the type as a cultural heritage and as one of the ways to recreate the surrounding world

Type is a cultural heritage, it is one of the ways to recreate the surrounding world

In this exclusive interview Botio Nikoltchev speaks about his professional development. He was a student of Lucas de Groot. After graduating he had the chance to work with such a famous type designers as Akira Kobayashi and Erik Spiekermann. Botio shares his views on diversity of Cyrillic letterform models in the different Cyrillic alphabets. He tells us about the project Sofia Sans, which is now the typeface of Sofia – the capital of Bulgaria. Botio also describes his newest font release Apparat and reveals his future plans.
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TYPOTHEQUE
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Szandra Peev

23 November 2020

TYPOTHEQUE

An interview with Peter Biľak from TYPOTHEQUE studio about the seemingly marginal languages and the need of font’s localization

Seemingly marginal languages are an integral part of the world

In this exclusive interview Peter Biľak shares why there are no marginal languages, which Bulgarian designer inspired him to start creating fonts with a Bulgarian form of Cyrillic and is the Bulgarian form of Cyrillic just an upright italic. He also talks about his latest plans and projects with South Asian languages.
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PUNKT
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Stefan Peev

30 October 2020

PUNKT

An interview with Krassimir Stavrev and Georgi Lazarov from PUNKT studio about the graphical identity of Plovdiv as a European Capital of Culture in 2019

How to turn a city into a capital of culture

In the final version of the Plovdiv’s logo (as a European Capital of Culture) we successfully synthesized the most important symbols of the city – the seven lines in an arch form symbolise: the silhouettes of the seven hills in Plovdiv, the mimic the famous vaults at the entrances of the Ancient Stadium and Ancient Theater. They also represent the shape of the theater from a bird eye view, they symbolize the letter P (in Bulgarian П) as Plodviv from our Cyrillic alphabet. We saw in these seven lines the curves of Maritsa river, the hundreds of arc windows built during the Bulgarian revival period and the architectural boom of our city in the XIX century. There are a few more words that correspond with the spirit of Plovdiv – namely multy layered, wide range, preserving and transformation, and last but not least a lot and together. The latter became the motto of the event for the whole year.
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Spacetype
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Stefan Peev

21 October 2020

Spacetype

Stan Partalev and Mirela Belova from the independent type foundry Spacetype talk about their very first common font family – Gogh which covers a broad spectrum of languages, including extended Latin and Cyrillic.

A typeface should be visually appealing and technically sound

We believe that type designers need to create products that they themselves would use. As we work on many other projects, we wanted a font that can be easily used in many contexts. This is how the font idea was born. We wanted it to be easily readable and at the same time usable for headlines.
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POSTERS & LETTERS / HANGUL & CYRILLIC
Exhibition

21 October 2020

Embassy of the Republic of Korea in Bulgaria
International Triennial of Stage Poster
Korean Brand Design Association

An exhibition of Hangul and Cyrillic collection of posters

POSTERS & LETTERS
HANGUL & CYRILLIC
October 24 – October 29, 2020

From October 24 to 29 in the main hall of the Gallery of San Stefano you will be able to see the exhibition “POSTERS & LETTERS / HANGUL & CYRILLIC”, presenting posters inspired by the Korean script “Hangul”.

The Korean Brand Design Association uses HANGEL as a starting point to invite authors from South Korea and around the world to create posters on the subject. The result is an extremely rich and diverse collection that explores the role of the written sign as a source of inspiration and artistic provocation, providing unlimited opportunities for contemporary visual reading.

Among the exhibition stand out the three posters of the talented current Bulgarian visual artist – Ivan Kashlakov, recently awarded a number of awards for graphic design, including that for a young Bulgarian poster artist “Assen Stareishinski”, presented by the International Triennial of Stage Poster.

The exhibition is organized on the initiative of the Embassy of the Republic of Korea in Bulgaria together with the International Triennial of Stage Poster and the Korean Brand Design Association.

 

Fontfabric
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Stefan Peev

15 October 2020

Fontfabric

Svetoslav Simov (CEO and founder, on the left) and Plamen Motev (type director, on the right) from the renowned Bulgarian type studio Fontfabric share their thoughts on the popularization of the Bulgarian Cyrillic and the key presence of the local type craft in the evergrowing font scene.

The Bulgarian type craft belongs on the global stage

Fontfabric thrives as an independent digital type foundry dedicated to crafting premium typefaces for over 12 years now. Drawing inspiration from both analog and digital typography practices, a compact team of talented designers aims to create future-proof fonts for exceptional projects and leave a legacy for generations to come.
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Content

Letters must come from our hands
Letter Collective
Book cover design in Bulgaria during XX century
Editor: Stefan Peev
Чавдар Мутафов. Шрифт (1932)
Чавдар Мутафов
Palimpsest from Bojana
Viktor Kharyk
German Capital Sharp S
Stefan Peev

 

Book cover design in Bulgaria during XX century
LOCALFONTS

10 October 2020

Virtual Exhibition

Book cover design in Bulgaria during XX century

The section presents covers of Bulgarian editions created in the XX century. The virtual exhibition is intended for type drawers that want to explore the development of the Bulgarian Cyrillic type form in the last century, but also the section in intended for graphic designers and book lovers.
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Letter Collective
Master classes

21 October 2020

Letter Collective

Todor Georgiev and Jacklina Jekova from Letter Collective creative studio offer free calligraphy practices on their website.

The art of beautiful handwriting and calligraphy

Todor Georgiev and Jacklina Jekova (Letter Collective) offer a series of classes suitable for everyone interested in the art of beautiful handwriting and calligraphy. Class A is free and perfect for beginners who want to learn the basic parameters in typography and the basic lowercase letters of the Latin and Cyrillic alphabet. The calligraphic tool in this class is a flat brush. See more on Letter Collective’s website.
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Letter Collective
LOCALFONTS INTERVIEW
Questions: Stefan Peev

22 September 2020

Letter Collective

Interview with Todor Georgiev and Jaklina Jekova, founders of the Letter Collective creative studio in Bulgaria, share their experience about creating fonts and their latest project, the font GRAFEMA.

Letters must come from our hands

The ideas for fonts are most often conceived as calligraphic or lettering experiments. Our concept at Letter Collective is based on the idea that letters must come from our hands, the instrument with which you write and draw. That being said, we do a lot of sketching before we start to build or transfer the letters into some kind of software.
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Letterbats
LOCALFONTS

10 October 2017

Vasil Stanev

Letterbats – a union of fine and typographic art

Letterbats are а special case of dingbat fonts – they consist not of images like pictograms or icons, but of pictures drawn to resemble a glyph, most often a letter.
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German Capital Sharp S
LOCALFONTS

10 October 2017

Stefan Peev

German Capital Sharp S

Capital sharp S (ẞ; German: großes Eszett) is the majuscule (uppercase) form of the eszett (also called scharfes S, ‘sharp s’) ligature in German orthography (ß).
Read More

 

FontLab 7

FontExpert

Nexus Script

Unitype

Grafema LC

Journal
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Ropa Soft Pro

Ropa Soft Pro
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Ropa Soft
Description

Ropa Soft Pro is Ropa Sans Pro’s charming sister. While Ropa Sans is cool and somewhat technical, almost like brushed steel, the new Ropa Soft Pro family brings a warm and friendly feel, closer to smoked wood, through its rounded corners.

The medium weights of Ropa Sans Pro serve well in body text, while the thinner and bolder styles make an excellent choice for headlines. Fonts from the Ropa Soft and Sans families can be used together to create a richer mix, and the humanistic italics round up the typographic system with additional quirky flavor.

To continue with the tradition established by Ropa Sans Pro, two styles of Ropa Soft Pro are available free of charge: the smooth and understated Regular and the strikingly distinct Extra Bold Italic.

Ropa Soft Pro provides advanced typographical support with features such as case-sensitive forms, fractions, super and subscript characters, and stylistic alternates. It comes with a complete range of old style and lining figures, witch are in tabular and proportional widths. In addition to an extensive coverage of Latin-based languages, Ropa Soft Pro provides essential support for the Cyrillic and Greek writing systems. It is manually hinted and optimized for screens, hence it has an excellent web-font, eBooks or Apps performance.

Design, Publisher, Copyright, License

Design: Botio Nikoltchev

Publisher: Lettersoup

Copyright 2016 by Botio Nikoltchev. All rights reserved.

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Free fonts

Download: Lettersoup

Commercial License

Buy at: Lettersoup

Buy at: Fontspring

Ropa Sans Pro

Ropa Sans Pro
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Ropa Sans
Description

Ropa Sans Pro is a sans serif font family of 8 weights plus extra designed italics and small caps, and Ropa Soft Pro’s cool sister. While the upright styles pay a distant homage to the technical aesthetics of the early-20th century DIN series, the strongly humanistic italics breathe in quirky freshness and create a unique flavor. Four styles (Ropa Sans, Ropa Sans SC, Ropa Sans Italic and Ropa Sans SC Italic) are available free of charge.

Suitable for both body and headline use, Ropa Sans Pro provides advanced typographical support with features such as case-sensitive forms, fractions, super and subscript characters, and stylistic alternates. It comes with a complete range of old style and lining figures, witch are in tabular and proportional widths. In addition to an extensive coverage of Latin-based languages, Ropa Sans Pro provides essential support for the Cyrillic and Greek writing systems.

It is manually hinted and optimized for screens, hence it has an excellent web-font, eBooks or Apps performance. lettersoup has also released the Latin-only basic subset of Ropa Sans Regular and Italic under the SIL Open Font License.

Design, Publisher, Copyright, License

Design: Botio Nikoltchev

Publisher: Lettersoup

Copyright 2014 by Botio Nikoltchev. All rights reserved.

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Free fonts

Download: Lettersoup

Commercial License

Buy at: Lettersoup

Buy at: Fontspring

Ropa Mix Pro

Ropa Mix Pro
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Ropa Mix
Description

Ropa Mix Pro is the third charming sister of the Ropa Type System. While Ropa Sans is cool and somewhat technical – almost like brushed steel and Ropa Soft Pro warm and friendly – closer to smoked wood, the new Ropa Mix Pro family combines the characteristics of its both older sisters.

The medium weights of Ropa Mix Pro serve well in body text, while the thinner and bolder styles make an excellent choice for headlines. Fonts from the Ropa Mix, Soft and Sans families can be used together to create a richer mix, and the humanistic italics round up the typographic system with additional quirky flavor.

To continue with the tradition established by Ropa Sans Pro and Ropa Soft, two styles of Ropa Mix Pro are available free of charge: the smooth and understated Regular Italic and the strikingly distinct Extra Bold Italic.

Ropa Mix Pro provides advanced typographical support with features such as case-sensitive forms, fractions, super and subscript characters, and stylistic alternates. It comes with a complete range of old style and lining figures, witch are in tabular and proportional widths. In addition to an extensive coverage of Latin-based languages, Ropa Mix Pro provides essential support for the Cyrillic and Greek writing systems. It is manually hinted and optimized for screens, hence it has an excellent web-font, eBooks or Apps performance.

Design, Publisher, Copyright, License

Design: Botio Nikoltchev

Publisher: Lettersoup

Copyright 2016 by Botio Nikoltchev. All rights reserved.

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Ropa Mix Pro in Use

WEB: Консерваторъ

Free fonts

Download: Lettersoup

Commercial License

Buy at: Lettersoup

Buy at: Fontspring

Milka

Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka
Milka

Font Sampler

(EN) The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. (NL) Op brute wijze ving de schooljuf de quasi-kalme lynx. (CS) Nechť již hříšné saxofony ďáblů rozezvučí síň úděsnými tóny waltzu, tanga a quickstepu. (HU) Jó foxim és don Quijote húszwattos lámpánál ülve egy pár bűvös cipőt készít. (RO) Înjurând pițigăiat, zoofobul comandă vexat whisky și tequila. (RU) Разъяренный чтец эгоистично бьёт пятью жердями шустрого фехтовальщика. (BG) Огньове изгаряха с блуждаещи пламъци любовта човешка на Орфей. (SR) Фијуче ветар у шибљу, леди пасаже и куће иза њих и гунђа у оџацима. (EL) Ταχίστη αλώπηξ βαφής ψημένη γη, δρασκελίζει υπέρ νωθρού κυνός. Type your own text to test the font!
Description

Milka is an 8-style stencil font family created by a team of designers born within the span of almost 70 years. It is a digital expansion on an alphabet designed in 1979 by the famous Bulgarian artist Milka Peikova.

The basic Milka font is a clean stencil design, while the Aged, Baked, Brittle, Crunchy, Dry and Soft styles are inspired by stencil and letterpress techniques and expand the usefulness by adding various degrees of warmth or roughness. The Milka font family has extensive Latin, Cyrillic and Greek character set support including localized forms for Russian and Bulgarian as well as numerous OpenType features.

Since 2014, Berlin-based Bulgarian type designer Botio Nikoltchev has been working with three Bulgarian female designers (the original designer Milka Peikova, who passed away in 2016 at the age of 96, and with Ani Petrova and Anelia Pashova, both from a young generation), as well as with Berlin-based Adam Twardoch and Andreas Eigendorf to create a modern revival of Ms Peikova’s inspiring stencil alphabet. Milka Peikova (1919-2016) was one of Bulgaria’s most famous female artists whose work has influenced several generations of Bulgarian designers. During her impressive career spanning almost seven decades, she created paintings, posters, book covers, textile designs and alphabets, both individually and together with her husband Georgi Kovachev-Grishata (1920–2012).

To try Milka in your project, download the Milka Free (uppercase-only) version!

Design, Publisher, Copyright, License

Design: Milka Peikova, Botio Nikoltchev, Ani Petrova, Adam Twardoch, Andreas Eigendorf

Publisher: Lettersoup

Copyright 2016 by Botio Nikoltchev. All rights reserved.

Specimen: Milka

Milka Peikova

Milka Peikova

Milka Peikova (b. 1919, Pavel, Bulgaria, d. 2016, Sofia, Bulgaria) was a famous Bulgarian artist. She created paintings, posters, book covers, portraits of famous Bulgarians, textile designs and alphabets, both individually and together with her husband Georgi Kovachev-Grishata (1920-2012). She is a graduate of the Bulgarian National Art Academy, class of 1948. She founded Cosmos magazine and designed for the Women Today and Problems of Art magazines.
In 1979, she designed an alphabet that was extended to an 8-style Latin / Greek / Cyrillic stencil typeface—Milka (2016)—by a team of designers at Lettersoup that includes Ani Petrova, Botio Nikoltchev, Adam Twardoch and Andreas Eigendorf. The basic Milka font is a clean stencil design, while the Aged, Baked, Brittle, Crunchy, Dry and Soft styles are inspired by stencil and letterpress techniques and expand the usefulness by adding various degrees of warmth or roughness.
Milka Peikova also designed the first Bulgarian typeface for phototypesetting called Grilimil with her husband Georgi Kovachev-Grishata. She is the recipient of the first prize for a typeface at the Bulgarian National Book Exhibition and Illustration.

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Ani Petrova

Ani Petrova

Type designer, b. 1988, Sofia, Bulgaria, who works at Fontfabric, Svetoslav Simov’s typefoundry. She completed her Bachelor’s degree at The National Academy of Art in Sofia. In 2014 she obtained a Master’s degree in type design.

Adam Twardoch

Adam Twardoch

Adam Twardoch (b. 1975) was raised in Tychy, Poland, and graduated from the University of Frankfurt/Oder, Germany. He worked at for Agentur GmbH, a Frankfurt/Oder-based design firm. Since 1991, Adam has advised numerous type designers on Central European extensions of their typefaces and has created localized versions of over fifty fonts. He frequently writes on type-related matters, and is the founder of Font.org, a (now defunct) website featuring articles about typography in English and Polish. Adam Twardoch is Director of Products of FontLab (since 2004), and is typographic consultant at Linotype (since 2002) and Tiro Typeworks (since 2001), and general font specialist at MyFonts (2000-2012). Since 2012 he is based in Berlin. Adam Twardoch is working in the field of font technology, multilingual typography, CSS webfonts, Unicode and OpenType.

Andreas Eigendorf

Andreas Eigendorf

Berlin, Germany-based font engineer. Designer of several CE versions of FontFont fonts, such as the CE versions of Ole Schaefer’s Fago: FF Fago Office Sans CE, Fago Office Serif CE (2000).

Free font

Milka Free: Lettersoup

Commercial License

Buy at: Lettersoup

Buy at: Fontspring

Sofia Sans

Font Sampler

(EN) The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. (NL) Op brute wijze ving de schooljuf de quasi-kalme lynx. (CS) Nechť již hříšné saxofony ďáblů rozezvučí síň úděsnými tóny waltzu, tanga a quickstepu. (HU) Jó foxim és don Quijote húszwattos lámpánál ülve egy pár bűvös cipőt készít. (RO) Înjurând pițigăiat, zoofobul comandă vexat whisky și tequila. (RU) Разъяренный чтец эгоистично бьёт пятью жердями шустрого фехтовальщика. (BG) Огньове изгаряха с блуждаещи пламъци любовта човешка на Орфей. (SR) Фијуче ветар у шибљу, леди пасаже и куће иза њих и гунђа у оџацима. (EL) Ταχίστη αλώπηξ βαφής ψημένη γη, δρασκελίζει υπέρ νωθρού κυνός. Type your own text to test the font!
Description

The story of Sofia Sans started with a phone call from Filip Boyadjiev, a colleague of ours and Ani Petrova’s former fellow student at the National Academy of Art Sofia. At the tail end of 2017, Boyadjiev informed us that his studio Fullmasters had been hired to develop a wayfinding system for helping visitors navigate Sofia’s tourist sights and attractions. That year, the Bulgarian capital had reached second place in tourism growth among European cities. The wayfinding system required a feature-rich OpenType family with a large character set including small caps, several figure styles, arrows, numerals in circles, etc. Most importantly, the fonts needed to offer support for Bulgarian Cyrillic, as all text was to be set in both Latin and Cyrillic.

Because of the modest budget and short deadline, creating a new type family from scratch for this purpose was not feasible. Fortunately, we had a viable candidate that we could expand to meet the project’s requirements: Attractive. The story of this humble font began with another phone call and a simple question. Earlier in 2017, my Bulgarian colleague Ani had asked me: “Why don’t we make a free font? A nice one, not a quick and dirty one! And let’s share it with the world.” A tiny seed was planted, but little did we know how big the project eventually would grow.
First, we needed to decide which kind of typeface to create. Going through potential type styles, we settled on a straight-sided sans. The inspiration for our design came from early-twentieth-century so-called technical sans serifs—typefaces with confident letterforms, a pronounced vertical impetus, and tense curves. We aimed to create a universally useful font family. With narrow proportions and a generous x-height, we drew a space-saving workhorse that would work well in very diverse environments: from large to small, for display and immersive reading, on-screen and in print. When looking for a name, we went back to that original question and christened our typeface Attractive.

Back to Sofia’s wayfinding system—Attractive only existed in two styles—one single weight in upright and italic—and had a limited character set. Still, it provided an excellent jumping-off point for developing an extensive type family. Fullmasters’ concept consisted of three types of elements: large and small totems containing text, directions, and map information, and signboards when only a minimum of information was necessary. We soon concluded that the typeface needed to have condensed widths too, to accommodate the different sizes of the two totems and the signboards. We also had to take into consideration the varying lengths of the names of streets, squares, parks, buildings, monuments, and other tourist sights featured on the signage. Eventually, we ended up planning a comprehensive type system in four widths with extended language support. It needed to cover Extended Latin as well as the Greek and Cyrillic alphabet because we wanted the fonts to support all three scripts used in the European Union.

Read the full story of the Sofia Sans at author’s web site LETTERSOUP

Design, Publisher, Copyright, License

Design: Botio Nikoltchev, Ani Petrova

Publisher: Lettersoup

Copyright 2019 by The Sofia Sans Project Authors. All rights reserved.

License: SIL OPEN FONT LICENSE

Botio Nikoltchev

Botio Nikoltchev

Botjo Nikoltchev, b. 1978, Sofia, Bulgaria. Botio studied graphic and type design in Potsdam. He is living and working as a freelance designer in Berlin. He studied communication design at the University of Applied Science Potsdam and took type design classes with Luc(as) de Groot. After his studies Botio worked with Ole Schäfer (Primetype) on the Cyrillic characters of PTL Manual, PTL Manual Mono and PTL Notes. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann as type designer and art director at Carrois Type Design, focusing on Cyrillic, Greek and Arabic language extensions and CI projects. In 2014, he set up the commercial typefoundry Lettersoup.

Ani Petrova

Ani Petrova

Type designer, b. 1988, Sofia, Bulgaria, who works at Fontfabric, Svetoslav Simov’s typefoundry. She completed her Bachelor’s degree at The National Academy of Art in Sofia. In 2014 she obtained a Master’s degree in type design.

Free License

Download v.4.000: Sofia Sans | Google Drive

Get permission to open a file on Google Drive

• Open the file.
• On the “You need permission” page, click “Request access”.
• The admins of the site will get an email asking for approval.
• After they approve your request, you’ll get an email.

Where to look for the latest version: GitHub

Sofia Sans in Use
WEB: Културен център СУ „Св. Климент Охридски“
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Carrois Type Design

Carrois Type Design

Ralph du Carrois

Carrois Type Design (Berlin, Germany) started up officially ca. 2010, although Ralph du Carrois has been designing typefaces since ca. 2002. This dynamic company in Germany has three art directors, Jenny du Carrois, Anja Meiners and Botjo Nikoltchev. All three also design typefaces, as well as Adam Twardoch, Andreas Eigendorf and Ralph du Carrois himself. The company specializes in custom type.